Completion grading: unintended consequences

Homework Should Support the SMP’s While all homework is up for discussion these days, and many argue it impinges on time for more worthy activities, I am a firm believer, for reasons Daniel Willingham (2009) describes, that most students need a considerable amount of practice outside the school day to develop and retain basic math … More Completion grading: unintended consequences

Why zeros on student work are important

There is a huge push in educator Twitter toward replacing zeros with 50% so that a student’s grades are not irreparably harmed by a student’s organizational skills or immature sense of responsibility.  What disturbs me most that this push is (inadvertently?) sending the message that teachers who assign zeros are not progressive, rather, punitive in … More Why zeros on student work are important

Why students can-can’t think like mathematicians and scientists

Educational writers and researchers seem to enjoy hacking on each others’ ideas.  I love a good debate because I learn so much and often change what I think and do based on a new insight.  Some controversies, though, are a nit-picking waste of time.  I have often discovered after a lengthy discussion that clarifying definitions … More Why students can-can’t think like mathematicians and scientists

When Math Isn’t Beautiful in the Eyes of our Beholders

I’ve been pondering the reflections of my colleagues who l-o-v-e math.  They love to play math games, be the first to solve a puzzle, and repeat the algorithms.  I appreciate their writings because they remind me of how important that is to convey in the classroom.  My experiences with math are mainly from a struggle … More When Math Isn’t Beautiful in the Eyes of our Beholders