Why zeros on student work are important

There is a huge push in educator Twitter toward replacing zeros with 50% so that a student’s grades are not irreparably harmed by a student’s organizational skills or immature sense of responsibility.  What disturbs me most that this push is (inadvertently?) sending the message that teachers who assign zeros are not progressive, rather, punitive in … More Why zeros on student work are important

Why students can-can’t think like mathematicians and scientists

Educational writers and researchers seem to enjoy hacking on each others’ ideas.  I love a good debate because I learn so much and often change what I think and do based on a new insight.  Some controversies, though, are a nit-picking waste of time.  I have often discovered after a lengthy discussion that clarifying definitions … More Why students can-can’t think like mathematicians and scientists

When Math Isn’t Beautiful in the Eyes of our Beholders

I’ve been pondering the reflections of my colleagues who l-o-v-e math.  They love to play math games, be the first to solve a puzzle, and repeat the algorithms.  I appreciate their writings because they remind me of how important that is to convey in the classroom.  My experiences with math are mainly from a struggle … More When Math Isn’t Beautiful in the Eyes of our Beholders

The Scrambled Math Mess for College Freshmen

Having prior experience teaching in colleges and having numerous recent conversations with college instructors, my conclusion is that little has changed yet at the college level with the Common Core math standards (CCSS-M) in place.  Far too many students still enroll in their first college math course (whatever that may be) lacking many of the … More The Scrambled Math Mess for College Freshmen